Tuesday, 10 October 2017

Photos, Postcards, Snippets, Occasional Notices etc (archived after one week...ish!)



Haslingden A.F.S (Click over to enlarge)

The above Photo is Haslingden A,F,S, and I think taken in 1940 it was taken by Mr Arthur Constantine who had a studio on Bury Rd next door to Mr  A Weston Headmaster of the Grammar School.
Photo Back Row: Joe O Leary msgr boy,Tom Green,Jim Pickup,Bob Anderson,Hebert McMahon,John Peel.
Front Row: George Fitton, Irving Mason,George Haworth. and one I don't know
(Photo and information: Kindly shared by Kevin Wissett)


Haslingden Station Workers with friends

INFORMATION REQUEST PLEASE!  - Could any of your readers help in naming any of the employees on the photo which can be seen on your Haslingden Station blog? (NOW SHOWN ABOVE) The employees pose in front of the footbridge at Haslingden Station. I've been told that the boy at the front is Richard Holden and that the date is c1906.
I believe my great-grandfather is on the photo but have no proof unless I can eliminate other names.
Thanks.
Best wishes 
Jean Tomlinson

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Helmshore United Football Club Raffle Ticket
Kindly shared to us by Lena Warburton and also archived under Memorabilia
(Click over to enlarge)


Annual Walking Day (Click over to enlarge)
Photo: Kindly shared by Maureen Kelly - LAST IN THIS COLLECTION

New Jerusalem group party  (Click over to enlarge)
Photo: Kindly shared by Maureen Kelly

Musbury Church procession (Click over to enlarge)
Photo: Kindly shared with us by Maureen Kelly

Haslingden Band - Charlie Mansfield (Click over to enlarge)
(Photo: Kindly shared with us by Maureen Kelly)

Harry Lambert and Peggy (Please click over to enlarge)
Photo: Kindly shared to us by Maureen Kelly


Harry Lambert and Friends (Click over to enlarge)
Photo: Kindly shared to us by Maureen Kelly

Netball - February 1958 (Click over to enlarge)
Showing Maureen Mansfield to front right hand
(Photo: Kindly shared to us by Maureen Kelly)

Old Newspaper Cutting referencing the book "Helmshore" by Chris Aspin and John Simpson
(Click over to enlarge)
NB - Please note the costings of the book mentioned in the article are not relevant to today
Cutting: Kindly shared to us by Maureen Kelly

The Rhymatics with Roy Mason, Charlie Mansfield and Jack Taylor (Click over to enlarge)
(Photo: Kindly shared to us by Maureen Kelly)

Haslingden Youth Club (Click over to enlarge)
(Photo: Kindly shared with us by Maureen Kelly)

Sunday School Photo - New Jerusalem Church (Click over to enlarge)
(Photo: Kindly shared to us by Maureen Kelly)

School Photo (St.Mary's?) (Click over to enlarge)
Photo: Kindly shared to us by Maureen Kelly

Haslingden St. Mary's procession going past the Memorial Gardens
(Photo: Kindly shared with us by Maureen Kelly)

Photo and text kindly shared by Jan Kozyl
This photo was taken in 1950 at St Stephen’s vicarage, Grane. These are European voluntary workers who ended up in Haslingden from Europe after World War 11. The European voluntary workers were needed for the reconstruction of the British economy and a large influx of immigrants of “good stock” were brought in from all over Europe. Official schemes were named Westward Ho and Baltic Cygnet. The government wanted people who would fit in easily with the established populations. My mother is mid-left on the photo, with her dress with white pockets and collar and says there were 4 Italian women and 8 German women lodging at the vicarage. My mother was recruited in Italy by representatives of John Warburton’s, Waterside Mill, Haslingden to work as a tenter there. My father, who came from Poland, worked in farms in Huntingdon, and Montrose before coming to work at Whittaker’s Grane Road Mill, Haslingden. There was more money to be made in the mills as a weaver than as a farm labourer. They stayed in the cotton industry until it’s ultimate decline. They did fit into Haslingden life and never received any discrimination there. They were naturalised in 1955. This is the story of my parents. Many had good experiences of living in Britain though some did not.

Regards Jan Kosyl.

Haslingden Cubs (St. Peter's ?)
(Photo: Kindly shared by Maureen Kelly)

Haslingden Weaving Shed (Click over photo to enlarge)
(Photo: Kindly shared to us by Maureen Kelly)

Haslingden County Primary School Photo (Click over to enlarge)
(Photo: Kindly shared to us by Maureen Kelly)

Crowning of Labour Party Peace Queen by Dr. Edith Summerskill c 1937.
(Photo: Kindly shared to us by Neil Stevenson from the Mary Davison Collection

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We have two recent emails come through requesting family information which can be viewed in the new FAMILY INFORMATION REQUEST BLOG by clicking here 


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INTERESTING PIECE KINDLY CONTRIBUTED BY: MARJORIE ROBBINS (Jorie Robb) 9th October 2017:

I came across your very interesting Haslingden blog by chance but I don't see any reference to a little bit of history that concerns World War 2, namely the influx of Londoners who were sent to Haslingden under Ernest Bevin's Essential Work Order, which became law in March 1941.  My father and his co-workers from the Robert Legg engineering firm in Shoreditch, who met the criteria defined by the Government as being in a "reserved occupation", found themselves working double shifts making munitions at the Wavell Works in Helmshore, which I think was a former textile mill.  While it was obviously preferable to being sent to the front or bombed out of your home in London, Haslingden was a very different world from central London and apparently relations between the Cockneys and the locals were sometimes strained.  Some of the Londoners described Haslingden, not very flatteringly, as a "cemetery with traffic lights". Food, of course, was rationed, and there were stories about "under the counter" supplies being reserved for the locals.  The two groups also spoke very differently.  People described me as a "whick 'un", a dialect word my parents had never heard before.

My parents had married on 7 September 1940, the day on which London experienced its first heavy bombing of the blitz.  I'm not sure exactly when in 1941 they were sent to Haslingden, but it's possible that my mother was pregnant with me at the time, as I was born at the Moorlands Maternity Home (in the old workhouse building that had become a hospital) in Rawtenstall in May 1942.  According to my mother, there was snow on the ground at the time.  The return to London wasn't authorized until June 1945, by which time a second daughter had been born in February 1945.

When I was born my parents were living in lodgings at 38 Warwick St.  Apparently the landlord wasn't too happy about the arrival of a baby, so we moved to a former shop at 112 Blackburn Rd.   I left Haslingden when I was just three years' old, but I remember the shop window, the iron balcony at the back of the building and courtyard below, as well as the toilet being at the end of the row.  I also remember St James's church, high up, opposite.  I'm pretty sure it must have been Whittaker Terrace, the back of which is shown in the photo on your site, but which no longer exists. I have a vague memory of hearing people going by in the street wearing clogs and I definitely remember seeing some kind of army vehicles (tanks?) rumbling along Blackburn Rd.  When my sister was born in February 1945, my 81-yr-old grandmother came up from London to take care of me and I was told that she used to push me up Grane (Grane Rd?) in my pram.  My parents were cyclists and liked to get out into the countryside on their tandem, with me in a sidecar.  My father made me a doll's house with the plywood from an old notice board, so I had a souvenir of Haslingden/Helmshore in my bedroom in London until the late 1970s, when I left to work abroad, and over 50 years after our return to London we still had a working secondhand pendulum clock that had been acquired during the "exile" in Lancashire.


Maybe someone still alive remembers the Londoners coming to Haslingden? 


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Maypole in Smithies Street, Carrs around c1940
Properties demolished 1970s
Holding the maypole is Susan Entwistle, Ribbons are Irene Barnes, Irene Handley and Doreen Bell,
Standing are Mary Davison and Doreen Rushton
(Photo kindly shared by Neil Stevenson from the late Mary Davison Collection)



This is Nuttall Street near to Prinny Hill which was to the left
of Mrs. Kings bric a brac shop and Danny Rudges Chip Shop

(from Joan Nuttall on 1st October 2017)
On the photos posted recently the name of the street to the left of Ridges Chippy was Nuttall Street. My gran (Elizabeth Beech) and Aunty (Clara Beech) lived at number 3, the one behind the street light,  for many years. As children me and my sisters spent a lot of time there. This was very poor housing with shallow stone sink and stone stairs and no hot water. Of course there was no indoor toilet . The tippler toilet had to be accessed by crossing the street and going down the back of houses on Blackburn Road and turning right at the bottom to another small row of houses and a row of shared  toilets. The photograph actually shows the back of the houses but this is the entrance everybody used. As you walked through past the houses there was a yard which housed an open lime pit.this is where the kids played (no health and safety then). I don't know who owned it but there were no gates on it and I don't remember ever seeing anybody there.

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or if you still want to check out
After one week the above photographs or text will be moved over to their appropriate blogs and will also be transferred over to  PHOTO ALBUM and SNIPPETS NO.5 (YEAR 2017 which can be accessed by clicking here


PHOTO ALBUM AND SNIPPETS NO.4 (year 2016) which can be accessed by clicking here

 PHOTO ALBUM and SNIPPETS NO.3 (year 2015) which you can access by clicking here

or if you still want to check out
PHOTO ALBUM NO. 2 (YEAR 2014) WHICH 

OR IF YOU STILL WANT TO CHECK OUT
PHOTO ALBUM NO.1 (YEAR 2013 AND BEFORE) WHICH 
YOU CAN ACCESS IN THE LEFT PANE BELOW



Dont Forget!  HASLINGDEN ON FILM is accessed from the title further down on the left hand column - please enjoy the films.

Family Information Request Blog (from October 2017)





This blog contains all the recent "Family Request Information".  Enquiries and submissions for inclusion here can be sent direct to: Jackie Ramsbottom on her email: jax1956@googlemail.com. Alternatively you can put your request on the blog "Facebook" pages

(Haslingden Old and New cannot accept any responsibility for any of the information contained in the following emails although we will do our best to try and check out the mails prior to listing here)


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CAN WE HELP JANE HARRISON WITH THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION (22nd Oct 2017)

But I am hoping you kind people could help me, I am looking for my 4 cousins, they are the children of my uncle Roy Harrison and his wife Edith HC Mason, Roy died in the year 2000, aged 66, I know they divorced and they had between them 4 children 2 sons John and Mark Harrison, and 2 daughters Carol and Susan Harrison, (I am guessing the ladies now could have changed there surname)On records that I have, there youngest child would be around 50 now, and all the births were registered in Haslingden. If anyone can help or knows/knew them, please be in touch or pass my message on to them, they have 4 cousins from Stoke On Trent who have been searching for them for a long time, we are the children of there uncle Jack. any information would be so gratefully received. Xx

CAN WE HELP PLEASE?  (From Samantha Freeman on 10th October 2017

I'm contacting you after coming across your fabulous blog! I just wish I had found it a just a couple of years earlier, when my Gran was still alive. She would have loved looking through all the old images and may have even recognised a few faces! She dies at 93 and could remember way back! 

Its a bit of a long shot that you would be able to assist me in my search but basically I've been working on my family tree for what feels like a gazillion years and have spent a small fortune on subscriptions to online search sites with worldwide access etc, and despite managing to trace many of my maternal family lines back to around the 1730 so far, I can barely confirm anything on my Paternal/grandfathers side. 
I have heard many family stories and memories from my Gran when she was alive, but cannot seem to link anything up.
Basically my family names are Simpson and Young and if I have got the line right, possibly through the Simpson line onto Ashworth and Booth too, but I really cant be sure. Hence my contacting you. 
My great granddad was Thomas George Young Jnr (b1901) He was who was a fish fryer on the Todmorden Road in 1939 and he and his wife Gladys Simpson. They had two sons Donald (My grandfather) b1900 (who was Coldstream Guard) and Billy (who took over the chippy from his Dad). 
Thomas was a well known in the area apparently and a well respected and long standing member of the “Buffs”, (Freemason Lodge in Haslingden). 

Thomas had two brothers Victor (a Merchant seamen (1939-1945) who on leaving the Navy moved to London and spent the rest of his life at sea on the The Queen Mary and The Queen Elizabeth etc as a Purser. He was also gay, so i guess the bright lights of the city beckoned!)
The eldest son was Albert and I cant race him at all.  
Their father was, if I have traced this back correctly, a Northern Irishman (Antrim/Belfast) by the name of Thomas George Young Snr (b1871) and who was, as my Gran described him a staunch "Orange Man". He was married to Mary Ann an Irish lass  family name "Macauley" I think, as the census records show her born  in Co. Fermanagh 1875. The records also show that Thomas Young Snr was a tram conductor in Rawtenstall in 1901 and a stoker at a cotton mill in 1911, living at Elm St and also at Lord St and finally retired, living at No3 Railway Cottages on the Burnley Rd in 1939. 

I would love to try and trace my Great Grandma Gladys Simpson, as I understand she was from a long line of Bacup lasses and would also like to find out a bit more about the Young  family in Bacup.  If there is any family historians or connections you think I could/should make, please let me know!
I pan to make a trip up to Haslingden at some point next year with my children. Let them see their family history first hand!

Any pointers would be greatly appreciated. 
Kindest regards
Samantha Freeman

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CAN WE HELP PLEASE (from Alison Boyd on 10th October 2017 

I am contacting you in the hope that you might be able to help finding information about my family,  particularly my father and his parents and grandparents, who all lived in the area.

The  family name is Barlow; my father was a Walter Barlow, born 1926. He lived at 325(?) Manchester Road, which I think is in Acre. I visited Haslingden and recognised the house from my childhood visits.
He attended Stonefold School (?) and  won a  scholarship to the Grammar School at the age of 10. He then went to Sheffield University and moved to Cleveleys, where I was born. he married my mum ( Anne Ireland) in 1952 or 1953 at Haslingden Parish Church.
His father was also Walter; he was the manager of the Co-op I believe, and retired, possibly in the late '50's' after 50 years' service. I remember my Dad telling me that during the war, he would occasionally come home with an extra pat of butter, after cutting customers' rations from the large slab from the dairy. My Dad's mother was Evelyn ( nee Grayden), and I think she ran the Cattle auction cafe, until the early 60' s perhaps.
My Dad's grandfather was also Walter! I have a rosebowl presented to him for 50 year's service at Rising Bridge Co- operative Industrial Society in 1916 ( so I guess he started there in 1866), but can find no information about it.

It was very unfortunate that, after my mum died, my dad destroyed all the photographs/letters etc that my parents had stored; he thought it would make life easier for me when I needed to clear the house. Consequently I have almost nothing from my parents' or my own childhood. As both my parents were only children, there were no siblings to help me either.

I know that it is unlikely that anyone would remember my dad, but if anyone can point me in the right direction to find out a bit more to add to my scant knowledge I would be so grateful.
Even just finding where any of his family is buried would be wonderful. I do know that they are not  at The Parish Church; I have been trying to find records for Haslingden Cemetery (I think there is one ) but have been unsuccessful.
I apologise for the length of this email, and understand if you don't feel that you're able to help. Best Wishes,
Alison Boyd ( nee Barlow)


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Thursday, 5 October 2017

Jim Barlow and Rileys Ironmongery and Cycle Shop


Below are some of the beautiful advertising posters which were used for RILEY's Ironmongery and Cycle Shop which was very well known at No.1 George Street, Haslingden







  (The above posters have been kindly shared by Jackie Ramsbottom)

                         

Obituary of Mr. Riley the original owner of the Cycle Shop prior to Jim
kindly shared to us by Jackie Ramsbottom


Jim Barlow at the age of 17 (c1927) who started work at Rileys and eventually took over the shop and retired in 1977
(Photo: Kindly shared to us by his nephew Brian Pickup)

Photo of Jim Barlow in Australia in 1977. When he retired he went
to Australia to visit his brother Edward
Photo: kindly shared to us by Jim's newphew Brian Pickup


Wednesday, 6 September 2017

The Derek Woodall Photo Collection



Here we have a selection of photos from the Derek Woodall Collection 

Derek Woodall was a local artist who worked at Accrington and Rossendale College  during the time they were based at the Old Grammar School on Bury Road.  Derek spent his lunch time taking photos of the area from which he based most of his drawings which he used to exhibit locally.  In 2015 he kindly allowed his photos to be copied and used for our Haslingden Memories Exhibition that year.  He hopes you enjoy them and that they bring back one or two memories.

I think this is the little Street near to Prinny Hill which was to the left
of Mrs. Kings bric a brac shop and Danny Rudges Chip Shop

On the photos posted recently the name of the street to the left of Ridges Chippy was Nuttall Street. My gran(Elizabeth Beech) and Aunty(Clara Beech) lived at number 3, the one behind the street light,  for many years. As children me and my sisters spent a lot of time there.This was very poor housing with shallow stone sink and stone stairs and no hot water.Of course there was no indoor toilet . The tippler toilet had to be accessed by crossing the street and going down the back of houses on Blackburn Road and turning right at the bottom to another small row of houses and a row of shared  toilets. The photograph actually shows the back of the houses but this is the entrance everybody used. As you walked through past the houses there was a yard which housed an open lime pit.this is where the kids played( no health and safety then). I don't know who owned it but there were no gates on it and I don't remember ever seeing anybody there.


Hartley Street - behind the Public Hall


Lodge belonging to Albert Mill (seen in the background) The Mill
was owned by Porritts and closeby were the mills of Carr Mill to the left
and across from it was Britannia Mill (CWS).  I spent many a hour
fishing in that lodge and caught sticklebacks and goldfish

Lower Lane which ran between Hud Rake and Church Street.
Opposite these houses was originally part of the Baxter's Brewery, and much
later was a Cotton Waste Mill, but in
more recent times it is the "West View" properties built on there.

This shows "Booth Street" (Station area) On the very left of the photo is what
was the Railway Hotel and the back gates where they took through the barrells
of beer. It was a Beverleys House. Also on the right you see the upended 
railway sleepers which formed the enclosure of the Railway Goods yard.
Top Church - St. James Parish Church overlooking.


This is yet another special photo and shows the sloping backs of the properties - 
On the left is what was Station Road,
On the right the properties of Railway Road, and directly in front is what was Delph Street.
The photo will have been taken from up on or near Station Steps.  It shows all the little buildings 
on the rear of the houses which were the "outside toilets" (tippler toilets) To read more about Tippler Toilets CLICK HERE


This is the old railway track were the by-pass is built now

This photo shows the area where the Haslingden Commercial Mill and Station Road used to be.
You can also see Delph Street and Booth Street, Robinsons Union Mill. The photo will have been
taken from up on Blackburn Road and not far away from the St. James lychgate.

This photo is again the old railway (prior to by-pass) and shows the backs of
the houses which were in the Mill yard (owned by Robinsons Mill). Just at the start
of the photo on the left hand corner was a small building which was a good yard
office for the railway. You accessed from opposite the bottom of Railway Road. Also
the mill showing half way along is the Brittania Mill (which was the CWS Slipper factory)



This is "Mucky Back" or its correct name is Back Beehive Terrace and runs to the rear of Blackburn Road and is accessed from Cross Street North



Rear of Peel Street overlooking Charles Lane



Alleyway which goes from the top of Grane Road through to Charles Lane

This is the top of Charles Lane, showing the Roebuck and the little shop attached and also the rear of some of the Lower Deardengate properties. 


Bowl Alley, Helmshore (pro Bal Ally) No.1 (Click over to enlarge)

Bowl Alley, Helmshore (pronounced Bal Ally) No.2 (Click over to enlarge)

Car Park (Now Market) at Ratcliffe Fold on site of the old Trinity Baptist Church

Car Park No.2 (now Market) at Ratcliffe Fold - originally the site of school (Cockerills) and this front side was were Trinity Baptist Church was (Click over to enlarge)

This is a cracking shot showing the "ginnel" entrance and the
many stone steps leading up to the Back of the Blackburn Road property
whilst below it was a separate house using the lower quarters. Photo
taken from Cross Street North 


This one is taken from up near the old railway bridge which was on Hud Hey Road,
and you can see the old railway after the lines and ballast were taken up. Also note the
sleepers for fencing (remnants still there today) Also Hartley's scrap yard and the rear
of Carr Hall Street properties. The late Harry Wilkinson's hen pens were just to the right
behind the bushes.

Back of Blackburn Road and showing the long gone Cross Street South
houses on the right hand side. Photo taken from near to where you head down
on the right to the mills in the bottom Vale, Union, Brittania, Albert etc



This is again to the back of Blackburn Road (near the back of Clifton House) and shows you the
bottom end of Cross Street North on the left hand side and Mucky Back or Back Beehive Terrace
on the Right hand side.

In that same area known as "Skinners" and showing Mucky Back to the right, and the old
placard on the side of "Bob Gardners" (fantastic and well missed grocers- who specialized in
home cured bacons etc)

Showing the pens and gardens to the back of Blackburn Road, taken from Hud Rake and close by
on the Left hand side of the photo was a shortcut path that leads between Hud Rake and Vale Street
Bus Stop.

This is another one which is the back to Cross St North/Blackburn Road and to this side
of the parked car is what they call "Vale Street" and at one time was the main thoroughfare
from Blackburn Road to the Mills down in the bottom on the right. The area also was known as
Skinners were once of a day there was a tannery.


This is another photo which shows the backs to what were the shops Co-op etc
and on the right are the backs to what was Cross Street North
This is where Commercial Mill was and high on the left hand side are the houses of Blackburn Road which
were opposite the St. James Lychgate which included Howleys Chemist
Top of Prinny Hill